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‘January Disease’ Hampering Efforts To Grow The National Herd

cattle
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By Zvikomborero Machirori

 

 

The government and farmers across the country are worried by the number of cattle that have been killed by Theileriosis, popularly known as January disease as this is hampering efforts to grow the national herd.

 

 

 

In addition to this, government is also worried by the continued outbreaks of foot and mouth disease which has also negatively affected livestock production.

 

 

 

While giving his speech at the National Breed Sale in Harare, Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Development Dr John Bhasera said the government has implemented the Presidential blitz tick grease scheme to help put Foot and Mouth disease under control.

 

 

 

“One million cattle farmers countrywide have benefitted from the Presidential blitz tick grease scheme and the programme will continue until the disease is under control” said Dr Basera.

 

 

Research shows that Foot and Mouth disease is causing havoc in the Southern African region where 10 countries out of 15 have reported the outbreak this year.

 

 

 

Dr Bhasera said through support from the second republic, the Directorate of Veterinary Services was making impressive efforts towards controlling the disease.

 

 

 

“The Directorate of Veterinary Services through the support from the Second Republic is doing a good job in managing the outbreak of Foot and Mouth as testified by the ability to have this premier sale conducted today,” he said referring to the national breed sale.

 

 

The numerous measures being implemented are in line with the Ministry ‘s Livestock Recovery and Growth Plan as part of its agriculture transformation programme.

 

 

Thousands of farmers across the country have lost their cattle to January disease and other tick borne diseases.

 

 

 

Animal health experts encourage farmers to dip their cattle and dose them to protect them from diseases.

 

Robert Tapfumaneyi